Shrinking populations in Sweden and the West – What’s the problem?

What is causing the ever increasing decline in birth rates in the Western world? This is a question that all the more people are starting to ask themselves as populations all over the world are getting older.

The problem

For quite some time we’ve been aware of the trend that there’s more and more old people in today’s Western societies, while kids keep on getting fewer. In Sweden, there’s been many discussions on the care of old people, pensions being reduced, and a general lowering of living standard as fewer people each year must work to support a larger group of ageing parents.

Since the hysteria surrounding the Covid virus arose, there’s been those pointing out a steep reduction in new births. This is not only affecting the countries that had the worst lockdown, but affected pretty much every country that took part in the hysteria. Some people are pointing towards the vagscenes as culprit, while others claim a change in the way we socialise.

It’s much more likely a combination of vary many variables, such as lifestyle change, more females in the workforce, worsening economy, people waiting longer to have children, unhealthier diets, seed oils, obesity, chronical diseases, mental health, a more insecure world, etc.

I could keep going but the point is we’re getting more unhealthy, mentally and physically, while the surrounding world are giving us every incentive to wait with children and to not settle down.

Solutions?

Are there any solutions to this issue that our leaders could actually implement?

Yes, and no. The solution is part of the problem.

Many governments are implementing pro-family regulations and solutions to the population problem. Some, like Sweden, are giving great benefits to families, while others, like Hungary, reduces income taxation for every child a Hungarian mother gives birth to, to the extent that they may never pay income tax ever again in Hungary.

While these types of benefits are well-meaning and do a lot of good for the families, it doesn’t address the underlying problem. There’s no change in the declining birth rates, after all.

Other options

Hungary is on the right track, but instead of only giving the reduced income tax to the mother, give it to the family, making sure they stick together and honour their marriage. Don’t pressure the mother out into the work force if she wants to spend time with the kids. Instead, allow for the father to be able to support his family while the mother is pregnant and staying at home with their children.

Both the Hungarian and the Swedish family programs are currently both geared towards getting the mother back into the work force as quickly as possible while completely disregarding husband’s role.

2024-04-28 01:57

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